Types of occasionalisms in Brandon Sandrson’s “The Stormlight archieve”

Authors

  • Altynbekov Azat Muratovich PhD Student, Karaganda Buketov University
  • Shara Mazhitaeva д.фн., профессор, Карагандинский Университет им. академика Е.А. Букетова, Караганда, Казахстан
  • Kakzhanova Fazira Aidarhanovna к.ф.н., профессор, Карагандинский Университет им. академика Е.А. Букетова, Караганда, Казахстан

Abstract

It is impossible to keep track of the current state of a modern language, especially English, the language spoken by half the world. It is worth noting that in addition to the appearance of new words, language develops at the phonetic, lexical, syntactic and semantic levels. In this way, language manifests itself as an instrument of cognitive interpretation, reflection on the surrounding world. And the more the composition of the language is replenished with new lexical units, the more developed are the various spheres of our life, because the cultural wealth of each nation is measured and manifested by its language.

In our study we will talk about occasionalisms. It is generally believed that this term was introduced in the 60-70s of the XX century by E. Khanpira, describing it in this way: "an occasional word (lexical occasionalism), or as it is often written, an author's neologism, is a word formed by an unproductive, unproductive, or even unknown to the language (occasional) word-formation model" [1].

  1. de Saussure in his time interested the scientific world by introducing the distinction between the concepts of "language" (langue) and "speech" (parole), where the occasional word in turn represents the completion of the analogy that is found in speech. This "new formation" is the result of the creativity of an individual - the author, which, in turn, makes it possible to reveal the meaning of this new word only in connection with its context [2; 266]. In other words, he is the originator of the trend of distinguishing "neologism - a fact of language; occasionalism - a fact of speech".

Published

2023-09-11

How to Cite

Altynbekov Azat Muratovich, Shara Mazhitaeva, & Kakzhanova Fazira Aidarhanovna. (2023). Types of occasionalisms in Brandon Sandrson’s “The Stormlight archieve”. Modern Scientific Technology, (4). Retrieved from https://ojs.publisher.agency/index.php/MSC/article/view/2105

Issue

Section

Philological Sciences